U – Z

  • Vinson, Frederick M. – American Jurist who served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from 1946-1953.
  • Wadlow, Robert Pershing – Tallest human on record being almost 9 feet tall, Wadlow was proud of his early acceptance by DeMolay and from his activities there, determined to be a Mason also. Looked at by many as a ‘freak’, DeMolay and Masonry helped Wadlow maintain a sense of normalcy for which he and his parents were extremely grateful. The US’s Public Broadcasting System has produced a documentary which places great emphasis on Brother Wadlow’s Masonic affiliations and includes many pictures of him as a DeMolay officer.
  • Wagner, John Honus – “The Flying Dutchman”, he is considered the greatest shortstop in the history of baseball.
  • Wagner, Sidney – Hollywood cinematographer. ‘The Postman Always Rings Twice’ (1946) was among the many films he photographed.
  • Wainwright, Jonathan M. – US Army General and the hero of Battan.
  • Wallace, Governor George C. – Alabama governor and US Presidential Candidate who was nearly assassinated and spent his remaining years in a wheel chair and in constant pain. (Masonic info Note: Anti-Masons enjoy pointing to George Wallace as a representation of racial discrimination, ignoring the great majority of the population of non-Masons who also espoused such positions at the time, including perhaps even their own relatives – both then and now! They also overlook the change in his later years and the fact that those whom he stood against were to later praise his humanity and recognize his change in heart.
  • Walker, Charlie – Country music singer and legendary member of the Grand Ole Opry.
  • Walkes, Jr., Joseph A. – Author of numerous publications particularly involving Prince Hall
  • Freemasonry and founder of the Phylaxis (Prince Hall Masonic research) Society.
  • Wallace, Lewis – American military leader and writer. During the American Civil War, he served in the Union army and reached the rank of Major General. At the close of the War, he was a member of the court that tried those accused of conspiring to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln. His novel, “Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ” won him a nationwide reputation.
  • Walker, William – Lt. Col. In the Confederate Army he was the first Master of Eastern Star Lodge in Louisiana and served as a District Deputy Grand Master. Killed in 1864.
  • Wanamaker, John – A statue of this Mason stands outside of Philadelphia’s City Hall. His expertise in business led to his appointment as Postmaster General and he established rural free delivery and parcel post. The University of Pennsylvania conferred upon him a Doctor of Laws degree shortly after the end of World War One. Their citation referred to Brother Wanamaker as: “Philanthropist, statesman, eminent in the councils of the nation, Christian Leader, and constructive genius who on the basis of the Golden Rule, by thought and practice has revolutionized the business methods of merchants of the world.”
  • Ward, Rev. John – First of the Episcopalian faith to enter Missouri and organize his people.
  • Warner, Glen Scobey “Pop” – Famous football coach, credited with originating the single and double wingback formations.
  • Warner, Jack – One of the brothers who created the American motion-picture production company known as Warner Brothers. They were the first to use sequences of sound in a silent feature film.
  • Warren, Earl – Succeeding another Mason (Frederick Vinson), Warren served as Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1953 to 1974 and led in sweeping changes in civil rights and criminal law.
  • Warren, Joseph, M.D. – Noted physician and American Revolutionary War General. Let the troops in the ‘Battle of Bunker Hill’ where he was killed. At the time of his death, he was serving as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts.
  • Washington, Booker T. – An educator and author.
  • Washington, George – As General of the Armies of the colonies, he led the revolution which created American independence. As the first President of the United States, his leadership was crucial to establishing the ‘tone’ for the United States. His love of Freemasonry is documented by his close reliance upon other Masons in the execution of his duties. Following his death, his widow sent locks of his hair (a common practice of the time) to Masons throughout the country and such revered treasures were the objects of great appreciation. To this day, a lock of his hair sent to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts is carried in a golden urn preceding the entry of the Grand Master at the Annual Meeting of the Grand Lodge.
  • Watson, Thomas J. – American inventor and businessman who was President and Chairman of International Business Machines (IBM) from 1914-1956.
  • Wayne, John – “The Duke” – One of the most popular actors of recent years. His ‘manly’ roles helped define a generation.
  • Webb, James E. – NASA Administrator.
  • Webb, Matthew – First man to swim the English Channel (1875).
  • Webb, Wellington – Mayor of Denver, Colorado.
  • Wentworth, William Carles – Well known for his exploration expeditions into the interior of New South Wales, he was also the editor of the first newspaper in Australia.
  • Wesberry, James P. – Pastor of the Morningside Baptist Church of Atlanta, Georgia for 31 years;
  • Recording Secretary of the Georgia Baptist Convention for 20 years. Died in 1992.
  • Wescott, Joseph H. – Former Deputy Commissioner, Pennsylvania State Police (retired 2000).
  • White, William – President of Baylor University 1948-1961; Executive Secretary and later President of the Baptist General Convention of Texas.
  • Whiteman, Paul – American conductor who introduced symphonic jazz to a general audience and became known affectionately as the “King of Jazz”. He commissioned Gershwin’s ‘Rhapsody in Blue’.
  • Wilder, Laura Ingalls – *Please don’t write to me saying “She’s not a Mason!” I know. She was the author of ‘Little House on the Prairie’ books and active in Eastern Star, an organization which requires a Masonic relative! (She’s part of the ‘Masonic Family’!)
  • Wilder, Lawrence Douglas – First elected Black Governor in the US from the State of Virginia.
  • Wilson, Robert – Member of the Texas Republic Senate during the 1830s and was twice candidate for President of the Republic of Texas.
  • Wood, Grant – American painter famous stylized realism and “American Gothic”
  • Woodbury, Levi – Governor of New Hampshire, US Senator, Secretary of the Navy, Secretary of the Treasury and Supreme Court Justice. Woodbury County Iowa is named for him.
  • Woods, William B. – American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court from 1880-1887.
  • Woodward, Carl R. – President of Rhode Island State College when it became the University of Rhode Island in 1951.
  • Wootton, Percy, M.D. – President, American Medical Association (1997)
  • Wyler, William – American motion-picture director, known for his many meticulously crafted, award winning films. In 1936 he was signed by American producer Samuel Goldwyn, beginning a ten-year collaboration that created pictures including Dead End (1937), Jezebel (1938), Wuthering Heights (1939), The Little Foxes (1941), Mrs. Miniver (1942), and The Best Years of Our Lives (1946). The latter two films won Wyler his first two Academy Awards for best director, also earning the awards for best picture.
  • Wynn, Ed – Movie actor and comedian, he introduced “Carmel Comedy Caravan”.
  • Young, Brigham – Founded the Mormon Church in Utah.
  • Young, Cy – American baseball player, he pitched for 22 seasons and was, perhaps, the greatest pitcher in the history of the sport. He pitched the first ‘perfect game’ in modern baseball.
  • Young, Andrew – Former United Nation’s Ambassador and Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia
  • Zanuck, Darryl F. – Co-founder of 20th Century Productions in 1933, his movie productions made him a legend. The memorial by his family notes his Masonic affiliation above all other accomplishments!